purpose

Wildbit knows that “pursuing relentless growth at all costs isn’t a sustainable way to build businesses or help people find meaning in their work.”

Today, Wildbit, creators of People-First Jobs, is celebrating 20 years of putting people first. In this video, they share their thoughts on the future of business and ask some great questions.

What sort of workplace are you creating that gives space for people to have a whole life, and bring their whole self to work?

We shouldn’t judge success of business, just based on the fact that it can create more jobs … if the jobs are crap or if the impact of the business is bad on the world, then is that still success just because it creates jobs?

Where the needs of the world and your talents cross, there lies your vocation.

– Aristotle

Without work, all life goes rotten, but when work is soulless, life stifles and dies.

– Albert Camus

You only have what you give. It’s by spending yourself that you become rich.

Isabel Allende

When a sense of dissatisfaction persists, that means it was placed there by God for one reason only: you need to change everything and move forward.

– Paulo Coelho, Aleph

How to find fulfilling work

The way that education can lock us into careers, or at least substantially direct the route we travel, would not be so problematic if we were excellent judges of our future interests and characters. But we are not. When you were 16, or even in your early twenties, how much did you know about what kind of career would stimulate your mind and offer a meaningful vocation? Did you even know the range of jobs that were out there? Most of us lack the experience of life — and of ourselves — to make a wise decision at that age, even with the help of well-meaning career advisers. …

We can easily find ourselves pursuing a career that society considers prestigious, but which we are not intrinsically devoted to ourselves — one that does not fulfill us on a day-to-day basis. …

“Without work, all life goes rotten, but when work is soulless, life stifles and dies,” wrote Albert Camus. …

It is common to think of a vocation as a career that you somehow feel you were “meant to do.” I prefer a different definition, one closer to the historical origins of the concept: a vocation is a career that not only gives you fulfillment — meaning, flow, freedom — but that also has a definitive goal or a clear purpose to strive for attached to it, which drives your life and motivates you to get up in the morning.

– Roman Krznaric. Via Brain Pickings.

If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.

– Antoine de Saint-Exupéry