human-centered design

The social dilemma

We tweet, we like, and we share— but what are the consequences of our growing dependence on social media? This documentary-drama hybrid reveals how social media is reprogramming civilization with tech experts sounding the alarm on their own creations. 

In a time when technology has become our lifeline, it is more important than ever that we examine the role it plays in our lives and realign it with the interests of people, not profits.

Learn more about The Social Dilemma and Center for Humane Technology.

The human mind

Because much human behavior is subconscious – that is, it occurs without conscious awareness – we often don’t know what we are about to do, say or think until after we have done it. It’s as if we had two minds: the subconscious and the conscious, which don’t always talk to each other. Not what you’ve been taught? True, nonetheless. More and more evidence is accumulating that we use logic and reason after the fact, to justify our decisions to ourselves (to our conscious minds) and to others. Bizarre? Yes, but don’t protest: enjoy it.

– Don Norman, The Design of Everyday Things

100% of customers are people.
100% of employees are people.
If you don’t understand people,
you don’t understand business.

– Simon Sinek

A responsible solution

In graphic design the issue of responsibility assumes particular importance as a form of economic awareness toward the most appropriate solution to a given problem. Too often we see printed works produced in a lavish manner just to satisfy the ego of designers or clients. It is important that an economically appropriate solution is used and is one that takes in proper consideration all the facets of the problem.

As much as this may seem obvious it is one of the most overlooked issues by both designers and clients. Responsibility is another form of discipline. As designers, we have three levels of responsibility: One – to ourselves, the integrity of the project and all its components. Two – to the Client, to solve the problem in a way that is economically sound and efficient. Three – to the public at large, the consumer, the user of the final design. 

On each one of these levels we should be ready to commit ourselves to reach the most appropriate solution, the one that solves the problem without compromises for the benefit of everyone. In the end, a design should stand by itself, without excuses, explanations, apologies. It should represent the fulfillment of a successful process in all its beauty. A responsible solution.

– Massimo Vignelli